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IMAGES IN CLINICAL PRACTICE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 54

Giant Vesical Calculus in a Girl Child: Rare Case Report


1 Department of General Surgery, Pacific Institute of Medical Science, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India
2 Department of Pediatric, Pacific Institute of Medical Science, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India

Date of Web Publication27-Mar-2018

Correspondence Address:
Praveen Jhanwar
House No. 1043, Ghyan Nagar, Sector 4, Hiran Magari, Udaipur - 313 003, Rajasthan
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/mamcjms.mamcjms_52_17

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How to cite this article:
Jhanwar P, Parasher V, Khatri R, Gupta V. Giant Vesical Calculus in a Girl Child: Rare Case Report. MAMC J Med Sci 2018;4:54

How to cite this URL:
Jhanwar P, Parasher V, Khatri R, Gupta V. Giant Vesical Calculus in a Girl Child: Rare Case Report. MAMC J Med Sci [serial online] 2018 [cited 2019 Aug 19];4:54. Available from: http://www.mamcjms.in/text.asp?2018/4/1/54/228651



An 11-year-old girl presented to our emergency department with retention of urine for one day. She had complained of lower abdominal pain with burning micturition since the last 6 months. On examination, there was fullness over suprapubic area. Kidney functions were normal. Kidney–ureter–bladder (KUB) X-ray showed a large radio-opaque shadow within the bladder region [Figure 1]. Ultrasound showed dilated pelvicalyceal system with thickening of the bladder wall.
Figure 1: KUB X-ray showing radio-opaque shadow at bladder region

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Suprapubic cystolithotomy was performed and an oval-shaped stone weighing 180 g and measuring 8.2 cm × 5.1 cm × 4.3 cm [Figure 2] was removed.
Figure 2: Vesical calculus 8.2 cm × 5.1 cm × 4.3 cm in size and 180 g in weight

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Giant bladder calculi are less common in female;[1] this is probably because outlet obstruction is much less commonly encountered in females. Surgery is the treatment of choice in the management of a giant bladder calculus, preferably an open suprapubic cystolithotomy.[2]

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Fortia ME, Bendaoud M, Sethi S. Giant vesical calculus. Int J Radiol 2009;10:1-3.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Chen S, Kao Y, Tse S. A giant bladder stone. J Tua 2003;14:201-3.  Back to cited text no. 2
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2]



 

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